Yearly Archives: 2015

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Kids & Gardening

Charlie Nardozzi
Horticulturist
www.kidsgardening.org

Kids Under Pressure?

Carl Honore
Author, Journalist
www.carlhonore.com

Car Seat Safety

Dr. Charmaine van Schaik
Pediatrician
www.cps.ca

Mom-a-holics

Jen Singer
Author, Mom
www.mommasaid.net

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Occupational Therapy for Kids

Sharon Rosenthal
Pediatric Occupational Therapist
www.caot.ca

Safe Sun Awareness

Dr. Ian Landells
Dermatologist
www.dermatology.ca

Pet Adoption

Steve Carroll
Cdn. Fed. of Human Societies
www.iamssponsoringfriends.ca

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Kids and Vegetables

Missy Chase Lapine
Author, The Sneaky Chef
www.thesneakychef.com

The Importance of Play

Wendy Smolen
Author, The Sandbox Summit
www.sandboxsummit.org

Kids and Headaches

Dr. Benjamin Burko
Pediatrician
www.tinytots.ca

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Young Author

Michael Moorehead
12-year-old Author
www.zombieislandbooks.com

Mission Nutrition

Lynn Roblin
Nutritionist
www.missionnutrition.ca

Kids, Teens & Responsibility

Michael Ungar
Author, Social Worker
www.michaelungar.ca

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Camping with Kids

Goldie Silverman
Author, Adventurer
www.campingwithkids.net

Work/Family Balance

Cynthia Dale
Actress, Singer, Dancer
www.cynthiadale.com

Kids & Physical Activity

Dr. Mark Tremblay
Sr. Scientific Advisor, Stats Canada
www.activehealthykids.ca

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Can you tell us a bit about the Where Parents Talk story?

Our company was started when each of us realized that there were no quality visual resources for new and expectant parents available.  That was in 2000 when web video did not exist and DVDs were just becoming popular.  As new and young moms ourselves, we decided to put our thirst for parenting knowledge alongside our professional background as television journalists to produce how-to parenting DVDs, focused on sharing simple nuggets of information in small digestible morsels to support parents with the many challenges and joys of parenthood.

 What are some exciting new developments for Where Parents Talk?

Our portfolio continues to grow, just like our kids! In addition to our how-to parenting DVDs and website, we have a parenting TV show, a monthly column in ParentsCanada magazine and are working on a national parenting radio program.

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Kids socializing on the pier

For many Canadian families, multiculturalism starts at home with a mix of winter traditions and celebrations. first!” He soon eased up and now even enjoys helping with the tree. Jennifer Kolari is a Toronto-based family therapist and the founder of Connected Parenting, an approach that teaches parents the techniques therapists use to change undesirable behaviours. “I think it’s beautiful to be blended,” says Jennifer. In fact in her own household that combines Judaism and Christianity, they joke that they celebrate “Chrismukkah”!

To read more click more

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You want to introduce your kids to the wonders of science, so you plan a trip to your local science centre for a day of exploration. When the day comes to an end, all the fascination and inquisitiveness that the excursion sparked in your children’s minds is put on hold until the next field trip. But it doesn’t have to be that way.

We are surrounded by science every day of our lives, and nowhere is that more evident than in the kitchen. Food is one of the most tangible and accessible gateways to the world of science that we can offer our children.

“Everyday stuff is not so every day, it’s really quite wonderful,” says David Sugarman, senior researcher at the Ontario Science Centre. “All cooking involves science.”

To read more click here

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Sometimes they need a little help letting go.

How many times has your mom or mother-in-law uttered the words, “We didn’t have half this amount of gear when I had my babies!” It certainly does seem that babies come with lots of stuff. Fast forward a few years and you’re in the thick of the toy-acquiring phase of your child’s life. Rarely does an event go by that isn’t accompanied by a new toy or trinket.

But what comes in eventually must – or should – go out. As with their clothing, children outgrow toys. It might, however, seem easier to get your child to part with a too-small T-shirt than a toy that might still hold some allure.

To read more click here