Pregnancy

Food Tips for Pregnant Ladies

During pregnancy, women have to follow a healthy lifestyle as prescribed by a doctor. The hormonal changes in the body of a pregnant woman can lead to several physical and mental changes. Interested in learning about food tips during pregnancy? You can select WhereParentsTalk to learn the best tips and advice on foods that pregnant women should eat. As a trusted online platform, we provide honest and accurate information and tips for pregnant women. You can find different types of recipes and food descriptions for pregnant women. The foods we recommend promote health in the most effective way and they never compromise on taste as well. Our food tips for pregnant ladies are based on the latest research and they are advocated by pre-eminent doctors and dietitians. Detailed information on cooking is also provided to make life a lot easier for pregnant women.

Lazy summer days wouldn’t be complete with our favourite warm-weather treats, but this summer, consider mixing up your family’s snacking routine with a variety of delicious – yet nutritious – bites.

Contrary to popular belief, nutritious foods don’t have to be a total yawn fest.  There are several ways to put a fun and delicious spin on healthy alternatives, see below for some inspirational ideas!

  1. Summer Salsa! Turn melon, strawberries and pineapple into a colourful salsa and serve it up with whole grain pita triangles sprinkled with cinnamon.
  2. Savvy Skewers! Layer a variety of fruit and berries onto a skewer with a dip of plain Greek yogurt spiked with honey, cinnamon and a dash of vanilla. T
  3. Popsicle Fun! Think of your favourite flavour combinations and freeze them in popsicle moulds or blend up a frozen banana with honey and a few tablespoons of unsweetened cocoa powder and you have instant chocolate banana ice cream.
  4. Delicious Dippin’! Kids love to dip, offer cut up vegetables along side a protein packed new spin on hummus by blending together edamame, tahini, roasted garlic and lemon juice, it’ll also taste great with some whole grain crackers.

Hungry yet?

Mixing in some nutritious alternatives will give your family that burst of energy they need to enjoy the rest of summer to its fullest! Enjoy!

Melinda Lamarche has been working as a Registered Dietitian for more than 10 years.  After completing her dietetic internship at the University Health Network in 2005 she went on to complete a Masters degree in Public Health Nutrition at the University of Toronto.  Melinda has experience working with Toronto Public Health and various Family Health Teams in the Toronto area.  Melinda recently completed a Culinary program and is using her new skills to prepare yummy and healthy dishes for her husband, daughter and new baby.

RELATED LINKS

Your Nutritional Guide to a Summer Full of Freshness

Delight Your Senses with Our Summer Produce Guide

Buy Local to Add “Spring” to Your Diet!

Why Pulses are the Family-Friendly Food of 2016

Incorporating Pulses Into Your Family’s Diet

Fall Foods Your Family Should Try

Real Food: Feeding Your Children Right

Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons

By: Melinda Lamarche

July and August are right around the corner and with these hot summer months comes another list of local fresh produce available for the picking.  The produce popping up in July and August are very similar so we’ve decided to combine them in one comprehensive guide.

Although you can find many of these fruits and vegetables year-round in the grocery store, it’s a special treat to enjoy these foods when they are available from local farmers; their fresh flavour can’t be beat!  Check out what’s available this summer and find ways to sneak these foods into your grocery bags and onto your family’s table!

Apricots

These light orange, fuzzy fruits are available in late July and August.  They are full of beta carotene an antioxidant common in orange produce.  Apricots also contain lots of vitamin C and lycopene, both with antioxidant power that help to reduce the risk of various chronic diseases.  Lycopene in particular has been linked to reduced risk of prostate, colorectal, breast, lung and stomach cancers. Apricots are also full of potassium, known to help lower blood pressure and of course, like many other fruits and veggies, these little fruits also contain fibre, helping with GI and heart health.

Buying

Look for apricots without any bruises or blemishes.  Make sure there are no browning soft spots as these spots will develop mold in no time.

Storage

You can ripen apricots in a paper bag and once they’re ripe, transfer them to the refrigerator. Keep apricots in a plastic bag or container to keep them fresh a little longer

Peaches  

In late July and early August we start to see baskets of peaches on grocery store shelves and at farmers markets.  Nothing beats the taste of an in-season, locally grown peach.  Peaches are great on the nutrition front containing lots of fibre, potassium, vitamin C, beta carotene and two other antioxidants called lutein and zeaxanthin.  Both of these antioxidants have been found to play a role in eye health by preventing macular degeneration.

Buying

Choose peaches that are plump and firm with no soft spots, bruises or blemishes.  Tan or brown circles on a peach are a sign of spoilage and like apricots, you will quickly see mold develop on these spots.

Storage

Firm peaches will ripen at room temperature in a few days, once ripe, refrigerate to prevent spoilage

Plums

Plums are also available during these very warm summer months.  Plums are great sources of Vitamin C, beta carotene and the B vitamin riboflavin.  This B vitamin helps the body convert carbohydrates into a source of energy. Beta carotene and vitamin C have antioxidant power helping to reduce the risk of cellular damage that can lead to chronic diseases such as cancer, heart disease and diabetes. Plums are also known to have high fibre content, especially when they are dried and referred to as prunes.

Buying

Plums come in a variety of colours from yellow, to red to a dark purple. Choose firm plums but avoid those that feel too hard as these were likely picked from the tree too early and will not taste as good, even as they ripen. Avoid plums that have cracks in them or discoloured spots or bruising.

Storage

Ripen at room temperature, then store, covered in a plastic bag or container in the refrigerator

Blueberries

Early summer brings us sweet strawberries, but as we move into the warmer months of summer, blueberries make their debut.  Blueberries are known for being full of nutritional value.  They contain phytochemicals called anthocyanins that act as antioxidants preventing cataracts and glaucoma.  The antioxidants in blueberries have also been found to reduce the risk of colon and ovarian cancers. Research also shows that blueberries may reduce the risk of Alzheimers, lower blood pressure and have a positive impact on heart health.

Buying

Buy blueberries that are deep blue and firm.  If some berries look crushed or damaged this is a sign of spoiling. Remove berries that are crushed or moldy as these will cause the rest to spoil quickly.

Storage

Store blueberries in the refrigerator. Wash before eating.

Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons
Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Raspberries

Raspberries are also available in July and August.  Raspberries are known to contain the most antioxidants per serving when compared to other berries.  Raspberries contain an antioxidant called ellagic acid which has anti cancer properties.  Their bright ruby red colour also means they contain anthocyanins which are antioxidants which have been shown to inhibit growth of lung, colon and leukemia cells.  And if all those health benefits aren’t enough, raspberries also contain lutein which promotes eye health.

Buying

Raspberries are the most fragile berry and can be crushed easily and spoil quickly.  Look for berries that are somewhat firm and have held their shape after being picked.  Take a look inside to be sure they are not starting to mold.

Storage

Raspberries can spoil very quickly, remove any berries that are crushed or moldy as these will cause the other berries in the same package to spoil quicker.  Keep refrigerated, and like other berries, do not wash them until you are ready to eat them.

Watermelon

Watermelon – the quintessential summer fruit. It is juicy and refreshing on hot summer days thanks to its high water content. These beautiful pink melons are a great source of lycopene, the antioxidant that has been shown to reduce the risk of prostate, lung and stomach cancer.

Buying

There are many tips and tricks to buying the perfect melon.  Choose a melon that is ripe, to determine ripeness, tap the melon, if it sounds hollow then it is ripe.  A ripe watermelon should feel heavy for its size.  Also, look for a side of the melon that is yellow or creamy and a bit flat, this is also a sign of ripening.

Storage

Keep the uncut melon at room temperature.  Wash the melon before cutting and store cut watermelon covered in the refrigerator.

Corn

Who doesn’t love fresh, local corn in the late days of summer?  Corn is a great source of folate which has been linked to heart health and also prevents neural tube defects in developing fetuses.  Corn also contains the B vitamin thiamin, like other B vitamins, thiamin plays a role in energy metabolism which means it is important for growth, development and the overall function of cells.  Corn is also a source of potassium which helps to lower blood pressure.  Corn helps to promote GI health with its fibre content and has been linked to a lower risk of lung cancer thanks to an antioxidant called beta-cryptoxanthin.

Buying

To ensure corn is fresh, look for ones that have bright green and moist husks with inner silk that is shiny and golden. Kernels should be plump and shiny, not dull and shriveled.

Storage

Corn loses its sweetness and flavour soon after being picked. Store corn in the refrigerator for a few days but don’t wait too long to enjoy.

Peppers

Different varieties of peppers are also available during July and August.  Peppers contain vitamin C helping to promote good immune function and acts as an antioxidant.  Peppers also contain vitamin A which is important for eye health and the B vitamins thiamin and riboflavin which play a role in energy metabolism helping the body use carbohydrates as a source of energy.  Red bell peppers contain more vitamin C and vitamin A then green peppers.

Buying

Choose peppers that are firm and feel solid.  The skin should be shiny and it should feel heavy for its size.  Avoid those that are wrinkled or shrivelled by the stem.

Storage

Store peppers in a plastic bag in the refrigerator

Tomatoes

Beautiful red tomatoes are popping up in gardens at this time of year.  Tomatoes are an excellent source of lycopene an anti oxidant with cancer fighting potential.  Lycopene has been linked to reduced risk of prostate, colorectal, breast, stomach and pancreatic cancers.  Tomatoes also promote heart health due to their folate and potassium content.

Buying

Choose tomatoes that are firm with shiny and smooth skin.  Avoid those that are bruised.

Storage

Always store tomatoes at room temperature.  Storing tomatoes in the refrigerator changes their texture and flavour.

Zucchini

Zucchini

Zucchini are another vegetable available in July and August. Zucchini are a great source of vitamin C, with just ½ cup providing more than 15% of the daily requirement for adults. This means that zucchini are full of antioxidants which play a role in boosting immune system and preventing some cancers and heart disease.

Buying

Avoid zucchini that are very large, those that are are allowed to grow beyond 6” in length and 2” in diameter tend to have less flavour.  Choose zucchini that are firm with shiny skin and avoid those that are wrinkled or bruised.

Storage

Store, covered in the refrigerator.  Try to use zucchini within 2-3 days.

Melinda Lamarche has been working as a Registered Dietitian for more than 10 years.  After completing her dietetic internship at the University Health Network in 2005 she went on to complete a Masters degree in Public Health Nutrition at the University of Toronto.  Melinda has experience working with Toronto Public Health and various Family Health Teams in the Toronto area.  Melinda recently completed a Culinary program and is using her new skills to prepare yummy and healthy dishes for her husband, daughter and new

RELATED LINKS:

Delight Your Senses with Our Summer Produce Guide

Buy Local to Add “Spring” to Your Diet!

Why Pulses are the Family-Friendly Food of 2016

Incorporating Pulses Into Your Family’s Diet

Fall Foods Your Family Should Try

Real Food: Feeding Your Children Right

 

Photo Credit: Creative/Wikimedia Commons

By: Melinda Lamarche

While the weather has been on the upswing for a while now, the official start to summer is just around the corner! School is winding down and friends and family are coming out of hibernation to spend quality time together, often over a meal or two (or three!)

To get you ready for this season of entertaining, we present our June produce guide featuring a bevy of popular fruits and vegetables to delight your summer senses!

This month the best finds will be cherries, strawberries, cucumbers and green peas.  There is truly nothing better than enjoying these seasonal goodies at the peak of their freshness!  These foods are not only delicious but offer great nutrition profiles, be creative and think of ways to make these foods the star of your family’s next meal!

Strawberries

Is there anything more quintessential to summer than picking and eating local strawberries?  Strawberries are available all year round at the grocery store, however we all know the flavour just doesn’t compare to the berries we can get locally this time of year.

Local strawberries tend to be smaller, but sweeter and with much more flavor than those we can buy at other times of year from other countries.  Strawberries are a great snack, quick and easy to prepare and eat and also full of nutrition.  Strawberries contain folate, Vitamin C, potassium, fibre and phytochemicals.  This nutritional profile makes strawberries strong contenders in fighting against heart disease, cancer, and high blood pressure all while helping to promote and maintain gut health with its fibre content.

Buying

Look for berries that are firm and plump with no white or yellow blemishes.  If packaged into pints or plastic containers look for one that is loosely packed with no moisture developing between the berries.  Strawberries are highly perishable and even the smallest amount of moisture will make those berries develop mould in no time.

Storing

Do not wash strawberries in advance, wash only when you are ready to eat or use them in a recipe.  Store them in a covered container or resealable bag.

Cherries

Cherries are great when picked locally; not only is their vibrant colour beautiful to behold but they are tasty and healthy to boot!  Cherries come in many varieties ranging from very sweet to very tart.  They also come in different colours from a bright blood red to a yellowish pink hue.

Regardless of the type of cherry you favour, they are all a nutritious and delicious. Cherries are high in soluble fibre, meaning that they are great for gut health but also help to lower cholesterol levels by binding with cholesterol in the body and helping to excrete it. Cherries are also high in vitamin A, C and potassium.  Their vitamin C content makes them a great antioxidant which can play a role in decreasing the risk of developing chronic diseases such as cancer and heart disease.

Buying

Look for cherries that are plump and firm with shiny exterior and bring colour

Storing

Store cherries unwashed and covered in a plastic resealable bag or container to maintain freshness

Cucumbers

Cucumbers are an undervalued vegetable in my humble opinion.  They taste great, especially when grown locally, are extremely hydrating due to their high water content and are a great source of vitamin C and antioxidants.  Cucumbers contain two prominent phytonutrients that act as antioxidants.  The phytonutrients that are found in cucumbers are called lignans and cucurbitacins.  Studies have linked these two phytonutrients to decreased risk of some cancers.

Buying

Look for cucumbers that are bright green without any yellowing.  Make sure they are also firm, have no moisture or indented spots and are without significant wrinkling, especially at the ends.

Storing

Cucumbers do best when stored in a cool environment, so keep in a resealable bag in the refrigerator.

Green Peas in the Pod. (Courtesy: Wikimedia Commons)
Green Peas in the Pod. (Courtesy: Wikimedia Commons)

Green peas

Peas are delicious when you can pop them out of their pods and eat them fresh.  This is the time of year to enjoy them that way.  Bursting with flavor, wonderfully sweet and part of the legume family, green peas are high in soluble fibre which benefits gut health but more importantly can play a role in reducing cholesterol levels and helping to improve heart health.  Peas are also high in Vitamin C, boasting antioxidant qualities, such as the aiding in the prevention of chronic diseases and folate which has been linked to better heart health and the prevention of neural tube defects in pregnancy.

Buying

When buying peas in the pod, look for pods that are tightly closed and firm to the touch.  Give the peas a little shake, if there isn’t any noise, you know that pod is tightly packed with sweet and delicious peas

Storing

Store fresh peas in a resealable plastic bag.  If freezing, shell the peas and freeze in a single layer on a baking sheet, once frozen, transfer to a plastic bag and store in the freezer.

Here’s to a wonderfully delicious and nutritious summer!

Melinda Lamarche has been working as a Registered Dietitian for more than 10 years.  After completing her dietetic internship at the University Health Network in 2005 she went on to complete a Masters degree in Public Health Nutrition at the University of Toronto.  Melinda has experience working with Toronto Public Health and various Family Health Teams in the Toronto area.  Melinda recently completed a Culinary program and is using her new skills to prepare yummy and healthy dishes for her husband, daughter and new

RELATED LINKS:

Buy Local to Add “Spring” to Your Diet!

Why Pulses are the Family-Friendly Food of 2016

Incorporating Pulses Into Your Family’s Diet

Fall Foods Your Family Should Try

Real Food: Feeding Your Children Right

By: Melinda Lamarche

It’s finally over!  The strange winter we’ve had has finally said goodbye and we are now enjoying beautiful spring days.  The beginning of spring also means that local produce will soon be finding its way into grocery stores and popping up at Farmers Markets around the city.

Eating fresh and local foods is not only a delicious way to enjoy fruits and vegetables, it also has a positive impact on health, the environment and the local economy as outlined below:

  • HEALTH: Buying local means fewer steps between the field and the table reducing the number of opportunities for contamination that can lead to food poisoning. In-season produce tends to have higher nutrition values than their out-of-season counterparts because they’re served up at peak ripeness.
  • ENVIRONMENT: Buying foods grown close to home decreases the distance between the farm and our tables, therefore reducing our carbon footprint.
  • ECONOMY: Buying local produce contributes to the local economy by supporting local farmers and growers.

The growing season is short in most parts of Canada due to cold and long winters but spring and summer weather allows local growers to grow delicious produce for us to enjoy.  Eating locally also means enjoying fruit and vegetables while they are in season.  During the spring and summer months we see the available produce change based on what is growing on trees and in fields at the time.

May marks the start of locally grown produce being available and is when we start seeing farmers markets re-opening across the city.  Here is your guide to what is in season this month! We start off with only a few seasonal foods being available at this time but the list will grow longer as we get closer to and throughout the summer months.

Rhubarb

Rhubarb season starts in May.  These long ruby red stalks are known for adding a tart yet delicious flavour to desserts and other dishes and are often paired with strawberries, pears or apples to add sweetness.  Rhubarb contains calcium, which plays a role in maintaining bone health, vitamin C and potassium, which helps to lower blood pressure.

  • Buying Rhubarb

Look for stalks that are bright red and that have full and fresh looking leaves.

  • Storing Rhubarb

Discard leaves as they are poisonous.  You may have to peel rhubarb to remove fibrous strings, wrap stalks in plastic wrap and store in the refrigerator.  Rhubarb can also be frozen.

 

Rhubarb Stalks, Source: Wikimedia Commons
Rhubarb Stalks, Source: Wikimedia Commons

Asparagus

Local asparagus is such a treat! It is much more flavourful than its out-of-season counterparts which travel to us from Mexico and Peru in the off season months.   Local asparagus is available in May and the start of June.

Asparagus is full of vitamins and minerals that are essential for health including vitamin A which is helpful for immune function, vision and reproductive health.  Asparagus also contains vitamin C which is an antioxidant which helps to fight against chronic diseases such as heart disease, cancer and diabetes; it also promotes tissue growth and repair.

Vitamin K, also found in asparagus, plays a role in blood clotting which helps to prevent excessive bleeding with cuts and scrapes. There is also folate which is essential in reducing the risk of heart disease as well as neural tube defects.  Folate has also been linked to a reduced risk of some cancers. Asparagus also contains two great forms of carbohydrates, fibre and inulin which is a prebiotic that promotes a healthy gut.

  • Buying Asparagus

Look for stalks that are bright green and crisp with tightly closed tips

  • Storing Aspargus

To keep asparagus fresh, trim the stems and place in a container of cold water, leave in the refrigerator and use within a few days

 

Radish

The fiery taste of local radish is available this month. This common addition to salads contains a great nutritional profile.  These little fuschia globes are full of antioxidants, including sulforaphane which has been proven to play a role in the prevention of breast, prostate, colon and ovarian cancers. Radishes also contain vitamin C and fibre.

  • Buying Radishes

Look for radishes that are firm without any cracks or dry spots.  The green tops should be fresh looking.

  • Storing Radishes

Remove radish greens, wash roots well and store in a plastic bag for up to 1 week.

 

Fiddleheads

Fiddleheads are a very interesting vegetable from the fern family.  Fiddleheads should never be eaten raw and must always be cooked.  These curly vegetables contain potassium, vitamin C and antioxidants.

  • Buying Fiddleheads

Buy fiddleheads that are tightly curled, crisp and bright green.

  • Storing and Preparing fiddleheads

Loosely wrap and store in a plastic bag, do not wash fiddleheads until ready to use.

To prepare fiddleheads remove the brown papery skin surrounding the fiddleheads, rinse in cold water thoroughly to remove dirt and cook thoroughly, 15 minutes in boiling water.  Fiddleheads should always be boiled before sauteeing, frying or baking.
Melinda Lamarche has been working as a Registered Dietitian for more than 10 years.  After completing her dietetic internship at the University Health Network in 2005 she went on to complete a Masters degree in Public Health Nutrition at the University of Toronto.  Melinda has experience working with Toronto Public Health and various Family Health Teams in the Toronto area.  Melinda recently completed a Culinary program and is using her new skills to prepare yummy and healthy dishes for her husband, daughter and new baby.

RELATED LINKS:

Why Pulses are the Family-Friendly Food of 2016

Incorporating Pulses Into Your Family’s Diet

Fall Foods Your Family Should Try

Real Food: Feeding Your Children Right

Fish Taco Bowl

Servings: 4

Ingredients

For the Slaw

  • ¼ cup Grapeseed oil
  • ¼ cup water
  • ½ cup chopped green onions
  • ½ cup cilantro leaves (optional)
  • 1-2 cloves garlic
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 2 limes juiced
  • ½ cup plain Greek yogurt or sour cream
  • 3-4 cups shredded purple and green cabbage

For the Fish Taco Bowls

  • 1 cup quinoa
  • 1 lb cod or other white fish
  • ½ cup brown rice flour or whole wheat flour (can use white all purpose flour if that’s what you have)
  • 2 teaspoons chili powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • avocado, salsa, lime wedges and shredded mozzarella cheese for serving

INSTRUCTIONS

SLAW:

  1. Blend the oil, water, green onions, cilantro (if using), garlic, salt and lime juice in a blender or food processor until chopped/chunky. Add the sour cream and pulse again until just combined (you don’t want it totally smooth more like an herby creamy sauce).
  2. Toss the sauce with the cabbage and Let it sit in the fridge while you prepare the other ingredients.

 QUINOA:

  1. Prepare the quinoa according to package directions.

 FISH:

  1. Pat the cod dry with paper towels and cut into bite-sized pieces.
  2. Combine the flour, spices, and salt in a shallow dish.
  3. Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium high heat.
  4. Dredge each piece of fish in the flour and add it to the hot pan, frying for a few minutes on each side. When the fish is golden brown, remove from pan and sprinkle with the salt.

 SERVING:

  1. Plate each dish with a scoop of quinoa, a few pieces of fish, a scoop of lime cabbage slaw, and avocado, salsa, grated cheese or any other toppings you like.
  2. Serve with lime wedges

Inspired by: http://pinchofyum.com/spicy-fish-taco-bowls-with-cilantro-lime-slaw

Shrimp and Kale over Cauliflower Mash

Servings: 4

Ingredients

For the Cauliflower Mash

  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 head cauliflower, cut into small florets (about 6 cups)
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 cup milk
  • 3 cups reduced sodium vegetable or chicken broth
  • 1 14-ounce can white beans, rinsed and drained
  • ½ cup cornmeal
  • ½ cup partly skimmed shredded mozzarella

For the Kale

  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 package kalettes, if you can find them Or 3 cups chopped kale
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced

For the Shrimp

  • 1 lb. shrimp
  • ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon onion powder
  • ½ teaspoon paprika
  • ½ teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon kosher or sea salt

INSTRUCTIONS

For the cauliflower

  1. Heat the olive oil in a large soup pot. Add the cauliflower and garlic. Sauté for a minute or two, until the garlic is fragrant.
  2. Add the milk and 2 cups broth. Simmer for 10 minutes or until soft.
  3. Add the while beans and mash roughly with the back of a large wooden spoon or a potato masher.
  4. Stir in the cornmeal (the mixture will start to thicken).
  5. Adjust the consistency by adding the last cup of broth to the consistency you want.
  6. Stir in the cheese and season to taste.

For the kale:

  1. Heat the extra virgin olive oil in a nonstick skillet over medium low heat.
  2. Add the greens and garlic and sauté until softened.

If using kalettes, add a little water at the end to sort of steam them to finish them off.

  1. Remove kale and wipe out pan with a paper towel.

For the shrimp:

  1. Using the same skillet as you used for the kale heat it over medium heat.
  2. In a small bowl mix the extra virgin olive oil, garlic powder, onion powder, paprika, salt and pepper together.
  3. Place shrimp into a medium bowl and pour oil and spice mixture over shrimp mixing to coat shrimp.
  4. Add shrimp to the skillet and cook the shrimp for ~1 minutes per side (pink and cooked through)

Serve the shrimp and kale over the cauliflower mash!

Inspired by http://pinchofyum.com/spicy-shrimp-cauliflower-mash-roasted-kale

Photo Credit: Creative/Wikimedia Commons

This week’s theme for Nutrition Month is Quality Counts, so that’s where we’ll be focusing our attention on the next leg of our 100 Meal Journey.

When it comes to meal-planning and home-cooking, quality of ingredients is incredibly important because it requires a lot less preparation and manipulation to turn fresh and healthy groceries into a delicious meal.

Here are my best tips for ensuring quality in your everyday cooking!

BUY SEASONAL, BUY LOCAL!

Buying seasonal and local produce is your best bet for eating fresh, high-quality food. I advise my clients to purchase a vacuum sealer and freeze in the freshness to get long term use out of their fruits and vegetables. Local products are also usually less expensive and as a bonus, you can support your local farmers and fisherman while you’re at it!

GET TO KNOW YOUR FOOD (AND THE PEOPLE WHO SUPPLY IT!)

Whenever possible, get to know your local food suppliers so you know exactly what you’re getting. If that’s unrealistic, do your best to shop at grocers who are purchasing from local farmers and whose stores are curated with the products, their customers and the environment in mind.

MAKE SENSE OF THOSE TRICKY LABELS!

When shopping for the week, it’s important to understand the meaning behind all those labels and what to look for when making your purchases. The options can be overwhelming, from Organic to Non-GMO, antibiotic-free to hormone-free. Here’s a primer on what those terms actually mean and how they’re regulated in Canada:

Organic

What does it mean for food?

  • No synthetic (man-made) pesticides, herbicides or fertilizers ,but can use approved “natural” pesticides
  • Do not contain genetically modified organisms (GMOs), antibiotics and growth hormones
  • Do not use irradiation or ionizing radiation
  • Higher price point than non-Organic (conventional) foods

Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs)

What does it mean for food?

  • Health Canada categorizes genetically modified foods as a novel food and defines genetic modification as changing “The heritable traits of a plant, animal or microorganism by means of intentional manipulation.”

What’s the purpose?

  • To lower price points
  • Enhance nutritional value
  • Improve environmental durability

Growth Hormones

What does it mean for food?

  • Used predominately in beef cattle to help produce leaner beef at a decreased cost
  • Not approved for use in dairy cows, poultry or pork

Antibiotics

What does it mean for food?

  • Promotes growth in animals (beef, dairy cattle, chicken, laying hens, turkey, pork, fish, sprayed on fruit, honeybees)
  • Used to prevent, manage ,and treat sick animals
  • Prevent disease in fruit crops
  • Used heavily on large commercial farms with high animal populations living in close quarters (translation: living in close quarters means when one animal gets sick there is an increased risk for all of the animals to get sick)

There are pros and cons to each of these designations and in some cases, the line is pretty blurry. For example, I don’t yet feel there is strong enough evidence to support that GMOs, antibiotics and growth hormones are harmful, but I am not convinced of their long term safety either. As a dietitian, I advocate for proper and transparent labelling of our food so that we as consumers can make informed decisions to choose high quality ingredients, regardless of how we define them.

BOTTOM LINE!

There are many ways to go about ensuring quality in your daily diet and these points I’ve outlined are just some of them. The best thing to do is ensure you’re as informed as you can be about what you’re eating and where it’s coming from, your family will thank you!

Please note that if you find that any of the information provided above is incorrect or insufficient please let me know. I would not only be happy to make changes but be grateful for any updates you can provide me with.

For more information on the regulation of organic products:

http://www.tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca/ongc-cgsb/programme-program/normes-standards/comm/32-20-agriculture-eng.html

For more information on Canada’s Food and Drug Regulations:
http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/C.R.C.,_c._870/FullText.html#h-144

Guidelines on how to wash your produce: https://www.eatrightontario.ca/en/Articles/Cooking/Food-Preparation/Everyday-tips-for-washing-vegetables-and-fruit.aspx

Amanda Lapidus is an experienced, innovative and supportive dietitian, mother and wife, living and working in Toronto.   She is one of the few dietitians who offers personalized and family focused care in the comforts of your own home.  Amanda completed her Honours Bachelor of Science in Foods and Nutrition at The University of Western Ontario and her postgraduate internship in clinical nutrition at Mount Sinai Hospital.   She is a member of the College of Dietitians of Ontario, Dietitians of Canada and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.  Amanda draws from a diverse career in the field of nutrition with a wide range of physical and mental health knowledge and a special interest in integrative and functional medicine. Amanda works using real foods and believes in making nutrition in your home simple, satisfying and sustainable. For further information, please visit www.simplynutrition.ca or to book a session, contact Amanda at: Amanda@simplynutrition.ca, 416-805-2584

RELATED LINKS:

Week One Recap: Meal Plan Your Way to Success!

Stocking-Up On Nutrition Month Essentials!

Following One Family’s Journey to Healthier Eating

5 Ways to Teach Kids About Nutrition

Reading Nutrition Labels

Show Your Fruits and Vegetables Some Love this Valentine’s Day

 

Lemon Chicken Stew prepared by the Etherington family for Nutrition Month.

Ingredients

3 tbsp grapeseed oil or olive oil
1 pound skinless and boneless chicken breast cut into 1-inch pieces
kosher salt to taste
freshly ground pepper to taste
3 tbsp all purpose flour
1 onion diced
4 carrots sliced
2 stalks celery
1 leek thinly sliced
3 cloves garlic minced
5 cups reduced sodium chicken broth
1 cup water
Juice of Lemon
3/4 cup uncooked orzo or quinoa
2 tbsp fresh tarragon or dill or parsley chopped

Instructions

In a large stockpot, heat 2 tablespoons of oil over medium high heat.
Season chicken breasts with salt and pepper to taste and dredge in the all purpose flour.
Shake off any excess flourand then add chicken to the stock pot.
Cook chicken until golden brown, about 2-3 minutes; set chicken on a plate aside.
Add the remaining 1 tablespoon of oil to the stockpot. Add the onion, carrots and celery to the stockpot and cook over medium heat for 3-4 minutes.
Add the sliced leek and garlic and cook for about 2 minutes and season with salt and pepper.
Add the chicken stock and water and bring to a boil.
Cover and simmer over low heat, stirring occasionally for about 20 minutes.
Add the orzo (or quinoa), return the chicken to the stockpot, cover and simmer for about 10 minutes or until orzo (or quinoa) is tender.
Stir in the lemon juice, season with salt and pepper and sprinkle with tarragon (or dill or parsley).
Serve immediately.

Adapted from http://www.foodiecrush.com/lemon-chicken-stew/

 

 

The Etherington family with their Nutrition Month pledge.

WhereParentsTalk.com is proud to announce our participation in Nutrition Month by tracking one family’s mission to eat healthier meals at home. We will update on their journey every week along with expert feedback on the concrete steps they are taking towards achieving their goal.

When I was first approached to work with Corey and her husband Ross on their 100 Meal Journey as part of Nutrition month this year, I knew the first place we needed to meet was the Etherington house. Ross and Corey, both work full time, Edie, their toddler is in daycare, and in April they will welcome baby number two. Life is already busy for the Etherington’s and it is about to become even more hectic! My best recommendation for busy individuals and families is to create proper meal plans.

When looking to cook more, it is important to make sure you are well prepared with a well-stocked kitchen; this goes hand in hand with creating meal plans. Cooking something new can be quite the task when your pantry and fridge aren’t stocked properly! This is something I notice very regularly when I go into my clients’ personal kitchens to help them with creating meal plans. It is much easier to cook a meal when all you have to do is go into your cupboard or fridge for 75% of the ingredients.

Etherington-family fridge stocked with essentials.

Corey and Ross happen to have a pretty well stocked kitchen, so when I went looking through their fridge, freezer and pantry, they had the majority of things on my Kitchen Essentials list. Not only does this list include food items, but kitchen tools are equally as important. I myself recently purchased all new knives (translation: 3 knives, that’s all you need!) and chopping my ingredients has become way less of a chore. Anything to make a task that seems daunting easier is completely worth it.

See below for a breakdown of all the kitchen essentials you need to put yourself on the pathway to healthy eating!

Kitchen Tool Essentials

  • 1 Sauté pan with a lid
  • 1 Dutch oven
  • 1-2 Sheet pans (aka cookie sheets)
  • 1 9 x 13’ baking pan
  • 3 Knives
    • 1 Multipurpose “Chef’s” knife chose an 8” knife “the work horse” or most versatile knife in the kitchen
    • Paring knife chose a 4” knife for my kitchen
    • Serrated or Bread Knife
  • 3 Mixing bowls (Large, Medium, Small)
  • 1 Colander
  • 1-2 cutting boards
  • 1 set of measuring cups
  • 1 set of measuring spoons
  • 1 set of tongs
  • 1 Wood spoon
  • 1 Whisk
  • 1 Spatula
  • 1 Can opener
  • 1 Meat thermometer
  • Kitchen towels
  • 1 Potholders/Kitchen gloves
  • 1 Loaf pan
  • 1 Casserole Dish
  • 1 Box grater
  • 1 medium pot with lid
  • 1 muffin tin
  • 1 soup ladle
  • 1 Vacuum Sealer > This makes defrosting frozen meat and fish a 5-10 minute task prevents freezer burn.

FOOD ESSENTIALS

In the Pantry

  • Canned diced tomatoes
  • Low sodium chicken stock
  • Oils
    • Neutral oil such as Grapeseed oil or Sunflower oil
    • Sesame oil
    • Extra virgin olive oil for salad dressings (not for cooking)
    • virgin olive oil (for cooking)
  • Vinegar
    • Balsamic vinegar
    • Apple cider vinegar or red wine vinegar
    • Rice wine vinegar (if you enjoy a lot of Asian style recipes
  • Low sodium soy sauce or Tamari
  • Honey
  • Maple syrup
  • Brown Sugar

Spices & Condiments

  • Salt (Sea salt, non iodized salt)
  • Black pepper
  • Garlic powder
  • Chili powder
  • Paprika
  • Cumin
  • Cinnamon
  • Nutmeg
  • Rosemary
  • Oregano
  • Bay leaves
  • Onion powder
  • Ground ginger
  • Ketchup Mustard
  • Mayonnaise
  • Hot sauce (Sriracha)

In the Freezer

  • Frozen vegetables
  • Frozen fruit (especially in the winter months)
  • Meat and poultry
  • Fish & shrimp

Now that the Etherington kitchen is ready I think it’s time to do some meal planning… stay tuned for that post next!

Amanda Lapidus is an experienced, innovative and supportive dietitian, mother and wife, living and working in Toronto.   She is one of the few dietitians who offers personalized and family focused care in the comforts of your own home.  Amanda completed her Honours Bachelor of Science in Foods and Nutrition at The University of Western Ontario and her postgraduate internship in clinical nutrition at Mount Sinai Hospital.   She is a member of the College of Dietitians of Ontario, Dietitians of Canada and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.  Amanda draws from a diverse career in the field of nutrition with a wide range of physical and mental health knowledge and a special interest in integrative and functional medicine. Amanda works using real foods and believes in making nutrition in your home simple, satisfying and sustainable. For further information or to book a session, contact Amanda at: Amanda@simplynutrition.ca, 416-805-2584

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Creative Commons/freefoodphotos.com

In Part 1 of our series, we introduced you to Pulses and explained why the United Nations has chosen to spotlight them in 2016 for their nutritional and environmental benefits. Now in Part 2, we unveil some family-friendly tips for incorporating pulses into your daily diet.

We hope you choose to make these powerhouse foods part of your next great meal!

How to prepare dry beans

Buying bags of dried beans is both an economical and healthy way to introduce more beans into your daily meals. Although canned beans are convenient, you may be surprised to find out that cooking dry beans at home can be just as easy and they freeze well for later use.

To prepare dried beans at home, follow these guidelines from Pulse Canada:

Long, cold soak, overnight

  • Place 1 cup of dried beans in a bowl and cover with 3 cups of water, place in the refrigerator to soak for 12 hours
  • Rinse, add fresh water and boll gently until tender

Quick soak

  • Bring 1 cup of pulses and 3 cups of water to a boil.
  • Boil gently for 2 minutes
  • Remove from heat, cover and let stand for 1 hour

Microwave

  • Combine 1 cup of pulses and 3 cups of water in a microwave bowl
  • Cover and microwave on high for 10 -15 minutes, let stand for 1 hour

How to include more pulses in your diet

Now that you know just how healthy beans, peas, lentils and chickpeas are, take on the challenge and be creative with these ingredients in your kitchen. Here are a few ideas for including more pulses in your meals and snacks:

  • Add pureed beans and lentils to baked goods such as cookies, muffins and brownies
  • Add cooked beans, lentils or chickpeas to green and grain salads for a boost of protein and fibre
  • Add cooked kidney beans, Romano beans or lentils to tomato sauces for protein boost to your pasta dishes
  • Toss a variety of beans, peas, lentils and chickpeas into soups instead of a grain such as rice or noodles
  • Try a bean dip such as hummus for snacks in between meals. Serve with cut up veggies or whole wheat pita
  • Replace ½ of the meat in chili recipes with beans or experiment with vegetarian chili recipe including a variety of beans
  • Add black beans to your tacos or burritos instead of or in addition to lean ground meats
  • Make recipes gluten free by using bean flours in place of regular wheat flour
  • Beans, peas, lentils and chickpeas make great purees for babies first foods. Puree and serve on their own or added to other foods such a grains or vegetable

Worried about gas and bloating??

Everyone knows that pulses such as beans, peas, lentils and chickpeas can sometimes lead to gas and bloating which can be both uncomfortable and embarrassing.

To reduce gas and bloating try the following tips from Pulse Canada to prevent these foods from being a musical fruit:

  • Change the soaking water 1-2 times before cooking dry beans
  • Do not use soaking liquid to cook the beans, always drain the water and use fresh before boiling
  • Cook beans thoroughly, undercooked beans are more likely to lead to gas and bloating
  • When using canned beans, rinse well before using in a recipe or consuming (this also helps to get rid of excess sodium in canned beans too!)

For more recipes and ideas for including more pulses in your family’s meals, check out PulseCanada.com to access a free online cookbook!

Melinda Lamarche has been working as a Registered Dietitian for just over 10 years.  After completing her dietetic internship at the University Health Network in 2005 she went on to complete a Masters degree in Public Health Nutrition at the University of Toronto.  Melinda has experience working with Toronto Public Health and various Family Health Teams in the Toronto area.  Melinda recently completed a Culinary program and is using her new skills to prepare yummy and healthy dishes for her husband, daughter and a baby on the way. 

RELATED LINKS:

Part 1: Why Pulses are the Family-Friendly Food of 2016