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Nutrition

Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons

By: Melinda Lamarche

July and August are right around the corner and with these hot summer months comes another list of local fresh produce available for the picking.  The produce popping up in July and August are very similar so we’ve decided to combine them in one comprehensive guide.

Although you can find many of these fruits and vegetables year-round in the grocery store, it’s a special treat to enjoy these foods when they are available from local farmers; their fresh flavour can’t be beat!  Check out what’s available this summer and find ways to sneak these foods into your grocery bags and onto your family’s table!

Apricots

These light orange, fuzzy fruits are available in late July and August.  They are full of beta carotene an antioxidant common in orange produce.  Apricots also contain lots of vitamin C and lycopene, both with antioxidant power that help to reduce the risk of various chronic diseases.  Lycopene in particular has been linked to reduced risk of prostate, colorectal, breast, lung and stomach cancers. Apricots are also full of potassium, known to help lower blood pressure and of course, like many other fruits and veggies, these little fruits also contain fibre, helping with GI and heart health.

Buying

Look for apricots without any bruises or blemishes.  Make sure there are no browning soft spots as these spots will develop mold in no time.

Storage

You can ripen apricots in a paper bag and once they’re ripe, transfer them to the refrigerator. Keep apricots in a plastic bag or container to keep them fresh a little longer

Peaches  

In late July and early August we start to see baskets of peaches on grocery store shelves and at farmers markets.  Nothing beats the taste of an in-season, locally grown peach.  Peaches are great on the nutrition front containing lots of fibre, potassium, vitamin C, beta carotene and two other antioxidants called lutein and zeaxanthin.  Both of these antioxidants have been found to play a role in eye health by preventing macular degeneration.

Buying

Choose peaches that are plump and firm with no soft spots, bruises or blemishes.  Tan or brown circles on a peach are a sign of spoilage and like apricots, you will quickly see mold develop on these spots.

Storage

Firm peaches will ripen at room temperature in a few days, once ripe, refrigerate to prevent spoilage

Plums

Plums are also available during these very warm summer months.  Plums are great sources of Vitamin C, beta carotene and the B vitamin riboflavin.  This B vitamin helps the body convert carbohydrates into a source of energy. Beta carotene and vitamin C have antioxidant power helping to reduce the risk of cellular damage that can lead to chronic diseases such as cancer, heart disease and diabetes. Plums are also known to have high fibre content, especially when they are dried and referred to as prunes.

Buying

Plums come in a variety of colours from yellow, to red to a dark purple. Choose firm plums but avoid those that feel too hard as these were likely picked from the tree too early and will not taste as good, even as they ripen. Avoid plums that have cracks in them or discoloured spots or bruising.

Storage

Ripen at room temperature, then store, covered in a plastic bag or container in the refrigerator

Blueberries

Early summer brings us sweet strawberries, but as we move into the warmer months of summer, blueberries make their debut.  Blueberries are known for being full of nutritional value.  They contain phytochemicals called anthocyanins that act as antioxidants preventing cataracts and glaucoma.  The antioxidants in blueberries have also been found to reduce the risk of colon and ovarian cancers. Research also shows that blueberries may reduce the risk of Alzheimers, lower blood pressure and have a positive impact on heart health.

Buying

Buy blueberries that are deep blue and firm.  If some berries look crushed or damaged this is a sign of spoiling. Remove berries that are crushed or moldy as these will cause the rest to spoil quickly.

Storage

Store blueberries in the refrigerator. Wash before eating.

Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons
Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Raspberries

Raspberries are also available in July and August.  Raspberries are known to contain the most antioxidants per serving when compared to other berries.  Raspberries contain an antioxidant called ellagic acid which has anti cancer properties.  Their bright ruby red colour also means they contain anthocyanins which are antioxidants which have been shown to inhibit growth of lung, colon and leukemia cells.  And if all those health benefits aren’t enough, raspberries also contain lutein which promotes eye health.

Buying

Raspberries are the most fragile berry and can be crushed easily and spoil quickly.  Look for berries that are somewhat firm and have held their shape after being picked.  Take a look inside to be sure they are not starting to mold.

Storage

Raspberries can spoil very quickly, remove any berries that are crushed or moldy as these will cause the other berries in the same package to spoil quicker.  Keep refrigerated, and like other berries, do not wash them until you are ready to eat them.

Watermelon

Watermelon – the quintessential summer fruit. It is juicy and refreshing on hot summer days thanks to its high water content. These beautiful pink melons are a great source of lycopene, the antioxidant that has been shown to reduce the risk of prostate, lung and stomach cancer.

Buying

There are many tips and tricks to buying the perfect melon.  Choose a melon that is ripe, to determine ripeness, tap the melon, if it sounds hollow then it is ripe.  A ripe watermelon should feel heavy for its size.  Also, look for a side of the melon that is yellow or creamy and a bit flat, this is also a sign of ripening.

Storage

Keep the uncut melon at room temperature.  Wash the melon before cutting and store cut watermelon covered in the refrigerator.

Corn

Who doesn’t love fresh, local corn in the late days of summer?  Corn is a great source of folate which has been linked to heart health and also prevents neural tube defects in developing fetuses.  Corn also contains the B vitamin thiamin, like other B vitamins, thiamin plays a role in energy metabolism which means it is important for growth, development and the overall function of cells.  Corn is also a source of potassium which helps to lower blood pressure.  Corn helps to promote GI health with its fibre content and has been linked to a lower risk of lung cancer thanks to an antioxidant called beta-cryptoxanthin.

Buying

To ensure corn is fresh, look for ones that have bright green and moist husks with inner silk that is shiny and golden. Kernels should be plump and shiny, not dull and shriveled.

Storage

Corn loses its sweetness and flavour soon after being picked. Store corn in the refrigerator for a few days but don’t wait too long to enjoy.

Peppers

Different varieties of peppers are also available during July and August.  Peppers contain vitamin C helping to promote good immune function and acts as an antioxidant.  Peppers also contain vitamin A which is important for eye health and the B vitamins thiamin and riboflavin which play a role in energy metabolism helping the body use carbohydrates as a source of energy.  Red bell peppers contain more vitamin C and vitamin A then green peppers.

Buying

Choose peppers that are firm and feel solid.  The skin should be shiny and it should feel heavy for its size.  Avoid those that are wrinkled or shrivelled by the stem.

Storage

Store peppers in a plastic bag in the refrigerator

Tomatoes

Beautiful red tomatoes are popping up in gardens at this time of year.  Tomatoes are an excellent source of lycopene an anti oxidant with cancer fighting potential.  Lycopene has been linked to reduced risk of prostate, colorectal, breast, stomach and pancreatic cancers.  Tomatoes also promote heart health due to their folate and potassium content.

Buying

Choose tomatoes that are firm with shiny and smooth skin.  Avoid those that are bruised.

Storage

Always store tomatoes at room temperature.  Storing tomatoes in the refrigerator changes their texture and flavour.

Zucchini

Zucchini

Zucchini are another vegetable available in July and August. Zucchini are a great source of vitamin C, with just ½ cup providing more than 15% of the daily requirement for adults. This means that zucchini are full of antioxidants which play a role in boosting immune system and preventing some cancers and heart disease.

Buying

Avoid zucchini that are very large, those that are are allowed to grow beyond 6” in length and 2” in diameter tend to have less flavour.  Choose zucchini that are firm with shiny skin and avoid those that are wrinkled or bruised.

Storage

Store, covered in the refrigerator.  Try to use zucchini within 2-3 days.

Melinda Lamarche has been working as a Registered Dietitian for more than 10 years.  After completing her dietetic internship at the University Health Network in 2005 she went on to complete a Masters degree in Public Health Nutrition at the University of Toronto.  Melinda has experience working with Toronto Public Health and various Family Health Teams in the Toronto area.  Melinda recently completed a Culinary program and is using her new skills to prepare yummy and healthy dishes for her husband, daughter and new

RELATED LINKS:

Delight Your Senses with Our Summer Produce Guide

Buy Local to Add “Spring” to Your Diet!

Why Pulses are the Family-Friendly Food of 2016

Incorporating Pulses Into Your Family’s Diet

Fall Foods Your Family Should Try

Real Food: Feeding Your Children Right

 

By: Melinda Lamarche

Summer is here and it’s time to hit the road!  Whether exploring new places or rediscovering old favourites, family road trips can be loads of fun and a chance to create lifelong memories.

To keep everyone’s spirits up throughout the journey, it’s a good idea to pack some delicious snacks to keep little tummies happy during those long stretches of highway.  Not only do homemade snacks save time and money along the way, they are also your best bet in terms of offering your family a healthy and satisfying nibble.

Below are some tips and tricks to keep you and your family well-fed while on the road, here’s to a happy (and healthy) journey!

SNACKING BASICS

  • Choose snacks those that contain a source of carbohydrate for energy and some protein to keep you feeling fuller longer, examples include: yogurt and fruit, cheese and crackers, nuts and dried fruit.
  • Before you hit the road, invest in a small cooler and ice packs. Look for reusable containers like mason jars and don’t forget to stock the napkins, wet wipes and utensils.

SNACK IDEAS

  • Yogurt, berry and granola parfait
    • Layer plain yogurt, berries and granola in a mason jar, sprinkle with cinnamon and a squirt of honey before sealing the lid
  • Hummus, veggies and bread sticks
    • Spoon a few tablespoons of your favourite storebought or homemade hummus into the bottom of a mason jar, place cut up vegetables in the hummus and place the lid on top. Serve with whole grain breadsticks or crackers on the side
  • Fruity tortilla roll ups
    • Mix softened cream cheese with a little bit of cinnamon, vanilla extract and maple syrup, spread on a whole grain tortilla. Place a mix of cut up fruit and berries on top of cream cheese, roll up and cut into 1” circles
  • Homemade mini muffins and fruit
    • Make a batch of your families favourite muffins, be sure to use whole wheat flour and keep the amount of sugar low, sneak in some mashed bananas or applesauce to hike up the nutritional value, for some fun stir in some nuts or dried fruit and chocolate chips, bake in a mini muffin tin to get more and keep portions snack sized.
  • Roasted chickpeas and cut up veggies
    • Rinse and drain a can of chickpeas, place on a parchment lined backing sheet. Sprinkle with 1 tbsp of olive oil, roast in a 400degrees for 30minutes, stirring occasionally, then sprinkle with your favourite flavours, try cumin, garlic powder and thyme.

Of course, you can’t go wrong with the tried and true snacks, think cheese and crackers, fruit and nuts and granola bars.

  • When buying crackers look for those that are low in fat, containing less than 5g of fat per serving, low in salt and containing at least 2-4g of fibre per serving. Choose unsalted and dry roasted nuts.
  • Granola bars can be tricky, they are one of those foods with a health halo, meaning they are often marketed as being healthier than they actually are. If buying granola bars, look for those made with whole grains (hint … whole grains should be listed as the first ingredient), low in fat and with less than 8g of sugar.  Making your own granola bars could be a fun way to experiment with your family’s favourite flavours.

So, this summer, pack your coolers and hit the road with some delicious and nutritious snacks to keep you and your crew fuelled for non-stop fun!

Melinda Lamarche has been working as a Registered Dietitian for more than 10 years.  After completing her dietetic internship at the University Health Network in 2005 she went on to complete a Masters degree in Public Health Nutrition at the University of Toronto.  Melinda has experience working with Toronto Public Health and various Family Health Teams in the Toronto area.  Melinda recently completed a Culinary program and is using her new skills to prepare yummy and healthy dishes for her husband, daughter and new baby.

RELATED LINKS:

Delight Your Senses with Our Summer Produce Guide!

Buy Local to Add “Spring” to Your Diet!

Why Pulses are the Family-Friendly Food of 2016

Incorporating Pulses Into Your Family’s Diet

Fall Foods Your Family Should Try

Real Food: Feeding Your Children Right

 

Fish Taco Bowl

Servings: 4

Ingredients

For the Slaw

  • ¼ cup Grapeseed oil
  • ¼ cup water
  • ½ cup chopped green onions
  • ½ cup cilantro leaves (optional)
  • 1-2 cloves garlic
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 2 limes juiced
  • ½ cup plain Greek yogurt or sour cream
  • 3-4 cups shredded purple and green cabbage

For the Fish Taco Bowls

  • 1 cup quinoa
  • 1 lb cod or other white fish
  • ½ cup brown rice flour or whole wheat flour (can use white all purpose flour if that’s what you have)
  • 2 teaspoons chili powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • avocado, salsa, lime wedges and shredded mozzarella cheese for serving

INSTRUCTIONS

SLAW:

  1. Blend the oil, water, green onions, cilantro (if using), garlic, salt and lime juice in a blender or food processor until chopped/chunky. Add the sour cream and pulse again until just combined (you don’t want it totally smooth more like an herby creamy sauce).
  2. Toss the sauce with the cabbage and Let it sit in the fridge while you prepare the other ingredients.

 QUINOA:

  1. Prepare the quinoa according to package directions.

 FISH:

  1. Pat the cod dry with paper towels and cut into bite-sized pieces.
  2. Combine the flour, spices, and salt in a shallow dish.
  3. Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium high heat.
  4. Dredge each piece of fish in the flour and add it to the hot pan, frying for a few minutes on each side. When the fish is golden brown, remove from pan and sprinkle with the salt.

 SERVING:

  1. Plate each dish with a scoop of quinoa, a few pieces of fish, a scoop of lime cabbage slaw, and avocado, salsa, grated cheese or any other toppings you like.
  2. Serve with lime wedges

Inspired by: http://pinchofyum.com/spicy-fish-taco-bowls-with-cilantro-lime-slaw

Shrimp and Kale over Cauliflower Mash

Servings: 4

Ingredients

For the Cauliflower Mash

  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 head cauliflower, cut into small florets (about 6 cups)
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 cup milk
  • 3 cups reduced sodium vegetable or chicken broth
  • 1 14-ounce can white beans, rinsed and drained
  • ½ cup cornmeal
  • ½ cup partly skimmed shredded mozzarella

For the Kale

  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 package kalettes, if you can find them Or 3 cups chopped kale
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced

For the Shrimp

  • 1 lb. shrimp
  • ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon onion powder
  • ½ teaspoon paprika
  • ½ teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon kosher or sea salt

INSTRUCTIONS

For the cauliflower

  1. Heat the olive oil in a large soup pot. Add the cauliflower and garlic. Sauté for a minute or two, until the garlic is fragrant.
  2. Add the milk and 2 cups broth. Simmer for 10 minutes or until soft.
  3. Add the while beans and mash roughly with the back of a large wooden spoon or a potato masher.
  4. Stir in the cornmeal (the mixture will start to thicken).
  5. Adjust the consistency by adding the last cup of broth to the consistency you want.
  6. Stir in the cheese and season to taste.

For the kale:

  1. Heat the extra virgin olive oil in a nonstick skillet over medium low heat.
  2. Add the greens and garlic and sauté until softened.

If using kalettes, add a little water at the end to sort of steam them to finish them off.

  1. Remove kale and wipe out pan with a paper towel.

For the shrimp:

  1. Using the same skillet as you used for the kale heat it over medium heat.
  2. In a small bowl mix the extra virgin olive oil, garlic powder, onion powder, paprika, salt and pepper together.
  3. Place shrimp into a medium bowl and pour oil and spice mixture over shrimp mixing to coat shrimp.
  4. Add shrimp to the skillet and cook the shrimp for ~1 minutes per side (pink and cooked through)

Serve the shrimp and kale over the cauliflower mash!

Inspired by http://pinchofyum.com/spicy-shrimp-cauliflower-mash-roasted-kale

Slow Cooker Asian Beef Bowl

Serves: 6 servings

Cook Time: 3 hours

Total Time: 3 hours 10 minutes

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds flank steak, trim excess fat and slice into one-inch pieces (against the grain), you can also buy packages of beef cut in “stir fry” strips
  • 1 tablespoon all purpose flour
  • 1/3 cup low sodium soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon grated ginger*
  • 1 tablespoon maple syrup or honey
  • 1 tablespoon rice wine vinegar or rice vinegar
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tablespoon grapeseed oil
  • 2 cups brown rice or quinoa, cooked
  • Shredded carrots, red cabbage, julienne cucumbers and chopped green onions for serving

HEALTHY ALTERNATIVE! Instead of using brown rice or quinoa try making cauliflower rice or combining half quinoa or brown rice with half cauliflower rice.

HEALTHY ADDITION!  Add kale or a leaf of your choice on top of the rice for an added green!

 Instructions

  1. Add flour and beef to a large resealable plastic bag (e.g. Ziploc) and shake to combine until flour equally coats beef.
  2. Put beef in slow cooker
  3. In a medium blow, whisk together soy sauce, ginger, honey/maple syrup, vinegar, garlic and oil.
  4. Pour over beef.
  5. Cover and cook on high for 3.5 hours.
  6. Once done turn slow cooker off and let rest for 30 minutes.
  7. Serve immediately with rice (or quinoa) and top with carrots, cabbage, cucumbers and green onions.
  8. Top with additional sauce and sesame seeds if desired.

Adapted from http://momtomomnutrition.com/food-and-recipes/slow-cooker-asian-beef/

*Kitchen Hack: Peeling ginger with a teaspoon is a lot easier and less wasteful than using a knife.

  1. Cut the amount of ginger you need.
  2. Hold the ginger in one hand and use the tip of your spoon to scrape off your peel.
  3. The peel is very thin and you should find that it comes off easily.

HELPFUL LINK: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M9zgXSdnPGI

 

Nutrition Month Poster

By: Corey Etherington

Nutrition Month has come and gone but our healthy eating journey is just beginning! I have learned so much over this past month and my goal moving forward is exactly what Dietitians of Canada has set out for all of the participants – to Make it Stick!

This past month gave me confidence in the kitchen that I didn’t know was possible. I overcame my own fears and self-doubt and realized that I actually CAN cook. That is a great accomplishment but the biggest feat by far was that I managed to successfully feed my family something fresh, new and tasty almost every night.

Prior to this challenge, I was feeding my toddler Edie in her high-chair while hurriedly trying to prepare something for Ross and I to eat once Edie was asleep. Being able to eat together over the last few weeks was awesome and Edie absolutely loved it. She looked forward to it and ate so much more than before. Eating as a family definitely made a difference for her and I know I want to keep that up!

I plan on taking all that I’ve learned and applying these healthy new habits moving forward. Below are just some of my favourite nutrition tips:

  • Create weekly meal plans
  • Write a detailed grocery list and stick to it!
  • Buy quality ingredients including more local ingredients whenever possible
  • Ensure I am cooking enough for next-day leftovers!
  • Continue to try new things and new cooking techniques

Amanda showed me that cooking at home is possible even with a busy lifestyle. Her guidance and encouragement really helped and I’m so thankful for the nudge she gave me to participate in the 100 Meal Journey. Working with a dietitian doesn’t have to be something we save for when there’s a health problem. I hope you have enjoyed following along and I hope you too can Make it Stick!

For more expert advice on healthy eating, contact: Amanda Lapidus, RD, BSc.Registered Dietitian, Simply Nutrition 416-805-2584, amanda@simplynutrition.ca, www.simplynutrition.ca

RELATED LINKS:

Week 4: Tips and Tricks for Trying Something New!

Week 3 Recap: Prioritizing Portion Size

Week 3: Prioritize Portions

Week 2 Recap: Quality Counts!

Week 1 Recap: Meal Plan Your Way to Success!

Stocking-Up On Nutrition Month Essentials!

Following One Family’s Journey to Healthier Eating

Edie Etherington enjoying her shrimp & kale over cauliflower mash during Week 4 of Nutrition Month

By: Corey Etherington

Wow, Nutrition Month is flying by!

This week’s theme of trying something new was not one I was super excited for, especially considering I’m nine months pregnant.  It took a little persuading and a lot of motivation but I’m proud to say I made it through with the added bonus of learning some great new recipes, here’s how the week went:

Monday: Shrimp & Kale over Cauliflower Mash

Ross & Corey’s Rating: So tasty! And so easy!

Edie’s Rating: Yummmm! Edie loved this meal.

I don’t generally cook with kale because I find it’s either or over or undercooked depending on the day, but with this simple recipe, it came out perfectly.  As for the cauliflower mash, where have you been all my life? It was so good and also so easy.

Corey’s Tip 1: One head of cauliflower makes a lot of mash. If you don’t plan on using it again the next day you can probably use half the cauliflower and have enough for dinner and a bit left for lunch the next day.

Dietitian Tip: Corey is right one head of cauliflower gets you a great deal of bang for your buck.  Cauliflower can last up to 10-12 months in the freezer.  Chop the cauliflower or “rice” it, use what you need for dinner and place the rest in a plastic freezer bag.  One mess for more than one meal!

Shrimp & kale over cauliflower mash
Shrimp & kale over cauliflower mash

Tuesday: Slow Cooker Lentil Soup & Marinated Skirt Steak

Ross & Corey’s Rating:

Soup – Flavorful and delicious!

Steak – I had to make a few modifications and it ended up being not as flavorful as I had hoped.

Edie’s Rating: I LOVE STEAK!

Corey’s Tip 1: The slow-cooker is always a good idea! This soup is full of vegetables and tastes amazing. I didn’t have ‘herbs de provence’ and even though it was on my grocery list I forgot to buy it. A quick Google search and a dive into my spice rack was all I needed to create something similar.

Corey’s Tip 2: I recommend skirt steak, as called for by the recipe, as opposed to another cut of meat.  We had flank steak on-hand and it didn’t come out quite as flavourful as we’d hoped.

Dietitian Tip:  Getting to know how to substitute cuts of meat can be very useful, but don’t be shy: ask the butcher at the grocery store what they recommend as a substitute. 

Wednesday: Fish Taco Bowl

Ross & Corey’s Rating: Insanely delicious!!

Edie’s Rating: Edie ate fish!! Edie ate fish!!

I sometimes find fish to be a challenge in the kitchen, but this recipe gave me a huge confidence boost because it came out so well!

Corey’s Tip 1: Cut the spice down a bit if you think your kids will eat it. I used 1.5 tsp of chili powder and it had some kick to it. Edie still ate it but I probably could’ve done 1 tsp and it would’ve been just as good.

Dietitian Tip: It’s important not to give up immediately when toddlers don’t like certain foods.  They may have to be presented with that food 15-20 times before they learn to eat or enjoy it.  Your best bet for success is to have that item at a family meal, enjoy it yourself but avoid applying any pressure to your toddler.  Remember those little people are allowed to have preferences too and they may just not like that food!

Fish taco bowl
Fish taco bowl

Thursday: Braised Chicken with Vegetables and Rice Noodles

Ross & Corey’s Rating: Ross is not a huge stir fry fan. Probably because it was the only thing I ever made when we moved in together and it wasn’t very good. But… this recipe was delicious!

Edie’s Rating: More chicken please!

I always want to use rice noodles in stir fry but I always ruin them. As it turns out, I’ve been missing one key step – soak the noodles in cold water before cooking with them!

Corey’s Tip: Add whatever vegetables you have in the fridge. The sauce is light and flavorful and tastes great on all vegetables – I added broccoli and water chestnuts.

Dietitian Tip: Stir fry is the best way to empty out your vegetable drawer!

Week four has been another great week. I tried new ways of cooking and I gained confidence in the kitchen. I was also able to make more dishes that did not require the slow cooker!

With all that we have learned over the past four weeks – meal planning, the importance of quality ingredients, portion control and now trying new things I really feel like we can make this stick. We have been eating well and saving money but most importantly we have been enjoying quality family time, can’t wait to invite the newest member of our family to the dinner table!

For more expert advice on healthy eating, contact: Amanda Lapidus, RD, BSc.Registered Dietitian, Simply Nutrition 416-805-2584, amanda@simplynutrition.ca, www.simplynutrition.ca

RELATED LINKS:

Week 4: Tips and Tricks for Trying Something New!

Week 3 Recap: Prioritizing Portion Size

Week 3: Prioritize Portions

Week 2 Recap: Quality Counts!

Week 1 Recap: Meal Plan Your Way to Success!

Stocking-Up On Nutrition Month Essentials!

Following One Family’s Journey to Healthier Eating

 

 

 

Photo Credit: Wikimedia/Creative Commons

By: Amanda Lapidus, RD, BSc

The theme for nutrition month this week is Try Something New! So I’m encouraging all of you to join the journey and try something different. Here are a few kitchen hacks to test out this week:

Monday

 Become a Garlic Guru

Q: Love using fresh garlic but hate that it takes so long to peel?

A: Microwave the head of garlic for about 20 seconds and the peels will slip right off.

Q: Can’t stand that your hands smell like garlic all day?

A: Try rubbing your hands on your stainless steel sink.  The stainless steel molecules  bind to the garlic molecules getting rid of that pesky smell.  Isn’t science cool!?

Tuesday

Cooking Gingerly:  Chop fresh ginger into one-inch pieces and freeze them for use at a later time! A microplane grater (like the one below from William Sonoma) is ideal for adding finely-grated ginger flavour to some of your favourite dishes!

How to Peel Ginger: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M9zgXSdnPGI

http://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/microplane-rasp-grater/
http://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/microplane-rasp-grater/

Wednesday

Skinning a Tomato:

  1. Make an X on the bottom of your tomatoes
  2. Throw them into a pot of boiling water for 1 minute
  3. Take the tomatoes out with a slotted spoon and put them into a bowl of cold water or an ice bath.
  4. Lift them directly back out, peel back the skin with a knife or your fingers.
  5. The skin will slip off like a charm.

 Thursday

Trim the Fat! Have you ever noticed a thin layer of oil on the top of a soup or stew? If you drop a couple of ice cubes into a soup, stew or casserole, you’ll see easy to scoop globs of fat form. This is because the fat will begin to congeal in the colder areas.

Friday

Don’t Boil Over! Ever walk away from the stove only to hear the sizzle of water boiling over on to the burner? Place a wooden spoon across the pot or pan of boiling water and it stops it from boiling over. Problem solved!

Saturday

Freeze-in the Freshness! Use ice cube trays to save fresh herbs, sauces and stocks to use for future meals. Just pop them out and reheat as part of your next meal. This cuts down on waste and helps save money too!

Sunday

A Juicy Tip! I love when a recipe calls for lemon or lime juice but some lemons and limes are a little more difficult to juice. The trick? Pop them in the microwave for a few seconds to make juicing them much easier.

I hope you find these tips both fun and useful in your journey to eating healthier meals at home!

For more expert advice on healthy eating, contact: Amanda Lapidus, RD, BSc.Registered Dietitian, Simply Nutrition416-805-2584, amanda@simplynutrition.ca, simplynutrition.ca 

 

RELATED LINKS:

Week 3 Recap: Prioritizing Portion Size

Week 3: Prioritize Portions

Week 2 Recap: Quality Counts!

Week 1 Recap: Meal Plan Your Way to Success!

Stocking-Up On Nutrition Month Essentials!

Following One Family’s Journey to Healthier Eating

5 Ways to Teach Kids About Nutrition

Reading Nutrition Labels

Show Your Fruits and Vegetables Some Love this Valentine’s Day

Korean Beef Bowl Prepared by Corey Etherington for Week 3 of Nutrition Week

By: Corey Etherington

Another successful week on our journey to healthy living!

This week we focused on portion control, something that’s been a challenge for us in the past as I tend to serve larger-than-necessary helpings that often lead to overeating. Our goal for the last seven days was to pay close attention to how much we were eating, to listen to our bodies and to walk away from the table feeling satisfied – not sick.

By applying the other lessons we’ve learned to date, including meal-planning and cooking with quality ingredients, we were able to prepare reasonable sized portions that were both healthy and delicious – and the slow-cooker only made an appearance once!

Here is what Week 3 looked like in our house:

Monday: Slow Cooker Asian Beef with Brown Rice

Ross & Corey’s Rating: Delicious!! Prep is insanely fast and easy and comes with a fun ginger peeling trick.

Edie’s Rating: Delicious!! Edie absolutely loved this dish. She even asked for it again on Tuesday night.

Corey’s Tip 1: The recipe says to cook for 3.5 hours but there isn’t a lot of liquid in this recipe so I decided to only cook it for 3 hours. Turns out that was a good decision as any longer and the meat would’ve been really dry. But… every slow cooker is different so just like Amanda told us to learn about our oven, learn about your slow cooker too.

Dietitian Tip: Cut the amount of brown rice by half and try making this dish with cauliflower rice to increase your daily vegetable intake.

Dietitian Tip: Add a green veggie like kale and serve the beef on top to add an extra crunch to the mix. Kale is a great source of Beta Carotene and C which are both antioxidants!

Tuesday: Skillet/Oven Chicken Burgers with Greek Salad

Ross & Corey’s Rating: WE LOVE BURGERS!

Edie’s Rating: More! More! More!

Corey’s Tip 1: I made a few modifications to the recipe, including: using ground turkey instead of chicken, eliminating cumin (personal taste) and barbequing the burgers for that delicious, charred quality. Lesson here – make whatever easy modifications you need to in order to ensure the family is eating a balanced, healthy homemade meal.

Corey’s Tip 2: Greek salad dressing is a staple in our house. I never put the salt in and I cut the sugar in half. I also use the optional oregano. LINK: http://www.food.com/recipe/greek-salad-dressing-57642?nl=email_share

Dietitian Tip: Corey is absolutely right! Modify recipes and replace herbs and spices that you’re not fond of with ones you love.   Experimentation is key!

Wednesday: Buddha Bowl

Ross & Corey’s Rating: Maybe we should go vegetarian?! This was so delicious!

Edie’s Rating: Edie tried this on Thursday night but only ate some sweet potato dipped in the tahini sauce. She liked it but was more interested in leftover turkey burgers.

Corey’s Tip 1: Mix-up the flavours according to your preference. This dish will work with any vegetable you have in the fridge and if the recipe is too spicy, modify it!

Dietitian Tip: This dish calls for Tumeric, the spice that gives curry its yellow color. Here are some healthy facts you might not know about it:

  • Curcuminoids or curcumin is the active ingredient in turmeric
  • Research being conducted looking at the the beneficial effects of cucumin on;
    • Inflammation, aging, depression, prevention of Alzheimers Disease
Preparing vegetables for the Week 3 Buddha Bowl
Preparing vegetables for the Week 3 Buddha Bowl

Thursday: Citrus Marinated Chicken

Ross & Corey’s Rating: Ross is obsessed with this chicken, the fresh ingredients taste like an explosion of summer!

Edie’s Rating: Edie wasn’t feeling the cilantro in this dish.

Corey’s Tip 1: I used chicken breasts instead of thighs. I prefer white meat so again, personal preference.

Corey’s Tip 2: This recipe calls for broiling. I am not good at broiling – I tend to overcook everything I broil so instead, I just baked the chicken.

LINK: http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Citrus-Marinated-Chicken-Thighs-51178850

Dietitian Tip: Setting timers is very useful! Broiling can be an important part of a recipe but sometimes it just needs a couple minutes. Turn the oven light on and keep on eye on your food.

SUMMARY

Week three was a really good lesson for us. We listened to our bodies and as a result, our meal planning really paid off. We had leftovers for lunch and even dinner if we wanted it! One of the best parts of the week was that Edie had something new every night and because I was so prepared, we were able to sit together as a family and eat dinner every night. Edie is such a good eater when we are eating too and she is more willing to try new things. It’s awesome!

I can honestly say that this journey has been an amazing experience so far and we have learned so much.

Week 4 is all about trying new things so wish us luck and follow along!

For more expert advice on healthy eating, contact:
Amanda Lapidus, RD, BSc.Registered Dietitian, Simply Nutrition

RELATED LINKS:

Week 3: Prioritize Portions

Week 2 Recap: Quality Counts!

Week 1 Recap: Meal Plan Your Way to Success!

Stocking-Up On Nutrition Month Essentials!

Following One Family’s Journey to Healthier Eating

5 Ways to Teach Kids About Nutrition

Reading Nutrition Labels

Show Your Fruits and Vegetables Some Love this Valentine’s Day

Lemon Chicken Stew prepared by the Etherington family for Nutrition Month.

Ingredients

3 tbsp grapeseed oil or olive oil
1 pound skinless and boneless chicken breast cut into 1-inch pieces
kosher salt to taste
freshly ground pepper to taste
3 tbsp all purpose flour
1 onion diced
4 carrots sliced
2 stalks celery
1 leek thinly sliced
3 cloves garlic minced
5 cups reduced sodium chicken broth
1 cup water
Juice of Lemon
3/4 cup uncooked orzo or quinoa
2 tbsp fresh tarragon or dill or parsley chopped

Instructions

In a large stockpot, heat 2 tablespoons of oil over medium high heat.
Season chicken breasts with salt and pepper to taste and dredge in the all purpose flour.
Shake off any excess flourand then add chicken to the stock pot.
Cook chicken until golden brown, about 2-3 minutes; set chicken on a plate aside.
Add the remaining 1 tablespoon of oil to the stockpot. Add the onion, carrots and celery to the stockpot and cook over medium heat for 3-4 minutes.
Add the sliced leek and garlic and cook for about 2 minutes and season with salt and pepper.
Add the chicken stock and water and bring to a boil.
Cover and simmer over low heat, stirring occasionally for about 20 minutes.
Add the orzo (or quinoa), return the chicken to the stockpot, cover and simmer for about 10 minutes or until orzo (or quinoa) is tender.
Stir in the lemon juice, season with salt and pepper and sprinkle with tarragon (or dill or parsley).
Serve immediately.

Adapted from http://www.foodiecrush.com/lemon-chicken-stew/